Review: Still Life with Bread Crumbs by Anna Quindlen

Still Life with Bread Crumbs: A Novel by Anna Quindlen
Random House LLC, 2014

About the Book (from amazon.com):

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

A superb love story from Anna Quindlen, the #1 New York Times bestselling author ofRise and Shine, Blessings, and A Short Guide to a Happy Life

Still Life with Bread Crumbs begins with an imagined gunshot and ends with a new tin roof. Between the two is a wry and knowing portrait of Rebecca Winter, a photographer whose work made her an unlikely heroine for many women. Her career is now descendent, her bank balance shaky, and she has fled the city for the middle of nowhere. There she discovers, in a tree stand with a roofer named Jim Bates, that what she sees through a camera lens is not all there is to life.

Brilliantly written, powerfully observed, Still Life with Bread Crumbs is a deeply moving and often very funny story of unexpected love, and a stunningly crafted journey into the life of a woman, her heart, her mind, her days, as she discovers that life is a story with many levels, a story that is longer and more exciting than she ever imagined.

My Review (4 Stars: Liked it a lot!)

At first I wasn’t sure of what to think about Still Life With Bread Crumbs, but the more I read, the more I liked it.  At times, I had to re-read a few lines to keep track of changes in thought or dialog.

Rebecca Winter, a once famous photographer, discovers a new life in upstate New York after leaving her life in Manhattan due to poor finances.  She rents a cabin and out of necessity meets, roofer, Jim Bates.

The descriptions of winter in the woods of upstate New York were wonderful.  I once lived in upstate New York and I enjoyed being reminded of the area.

The author,  Anna Quindlen, shows us how our lives and perspective’s change with time.  The story encompasses family (for better or worse).  The characters and circumstances in this story seem realistic.  I enjoyed Rebecca’s journey, seeing how her perspectives as a photographer and as a person change.

I agree with the New York Times’ Sunday Book Review, Second Shot, Anna Quindlen’s ‘Still Life With Bread Crumbs’ by By Joanna Rakoff: 

“…Quindlen has delivered a novel that will have staying power…”

Author’s Bio (from the author’s website)

Anna Quindlen is the author of six previous bestselling novels (Rise and Shine, Blessings, Object Lessons, One True Thing, Black and Blue, and Every Last One), and eight nonfiction books (A Short Guide to a Happy Life, Good Dog. Stay., Being Perfect, Loud & Clear, Living Out Loud, Thinking Out Loud, How Reading Changed My Life, and Lots of Candles, Plenty of Cake). Her New York Times column “Public and Private” won the Pulitzer Prize in 1992. From 2000-2009, She wrote the “Last Word” column for Newsweek.

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