Review: The Promise Between Us by Barbara Claypole White

the promis between us

Mental illness is a tough topic to discuss.  Barbra Claypole White, in  The Promise Between Us, does an excellent job giving us insight into OCD (Obsessive Compulsive Disorder) through an entertaining story about a mother (Katie) and daughter (Maisie) who both have OCD.

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  • Paperback: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Lake Union Publishing (January 16, 2018)

Forms of OCD are different, yet similar.  Katie uses mantras to face down the relentless, unwanted, thoughts in her head.  One of her mantras, repeated often, is:

“A thought is just a thought.  It has no power.”

Continue reading “Review: The Promise Between Us by Barbara Claypole White”

Review: Beartown by Fredrik Backman

Bear Town

I was glad to read my book club’s selection, Beartown by Fredrik Backman, narrated by Marin Ireland.

So many people, recently, have been talking about “A Man Called Ove” and “My Grandmother Asked Me to Tell You She’s Sorry: A Novel.”  However, I have not, until now, had the chance to read/listen to one of this author’s novels.

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  • Audible Audio Edition
  • Listening Length: 13 hours and 11 minutes
  • Program Type: Audiobook
  • Version: Unabridged
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster Audio
  • Audible.com Release Date: April 25, 2017

Beartown is a story about a small town, who’s existence revolves around ice hockey. The junior team, this particular year, is headed for the semi-finals with a good chance at winning the finals.

In essence we see, when bad things happen and controversy strikes, the heavily ingrained ‘ice-hockey’ culture affects the overall views and culture of the town-folk.  People begin to take sides.

It seems the entire town is explored from players to coaches, teachers, parents, students, local factory workers, the local pub owner, hockey club board members, sponsors …  We learn who is on the right side and who is on the wrong side.

One observation (not a complaint) is that the author, seems to be vested in all of his characters as, in addition to the main story, many tidbits of information about the various character’s past, present and futures are included.  The over development of characters works well in this small-town story.

Continue reading “Review: Beartown by Fredrik Backman”

Book Review: Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng

little fires everywhere
Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng
(Purchase)
  • Audible Audio Edition
  • Listening Length: 11 hours and 27 minutes
  • Program Type: Audiobook
  • Version: Unabridged
  • Publisher: Penguin Audio
  • Audible.com Release Date: September 12, 2017

My Review ( 5 Stars: Loved it!)

Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng is a well written, well thought out story.  The first half is devoted to laying ground work and building characters, the second half is to the engrossing plot.

Set in the time period around 1980, I’ve tagged this novel as Historical Fiction as it describes the times of that period (making me feel old).  I remember the history and time period well.

I read/listened to Little Fires Everywhere in starts and stops and found it was no problem picking up where I left off and no problem enjoy each and every chapter.  The narrator, Jennifer Lim, did an excellent job.

At the heart of this story are two families, at different sides of the spectrum, one very domestic and middle-class with a mother, father, and four children and the other a mother and daughter who are nomads.  The children are adolescents.  The focus of the novel is the mother/child relationship.  I am amazed at the number of perspective Ng manages to bring into this story.

While I have marked this novel as Historical Fiction, the 1980s were not too long ago and the issues at the heart of this novel have not changed much.

In Ng’s previous, debut, novel, Everything I Never Told You, family dynamics and disconnects were central to the story.  So far, this is common theme in her work.

Continue reading “Book Review: Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng”

Book Brief: The Mountain Between Us by Charles Martin

The Mountain Between Us

I listened to the audio version of The Mountain Between Us: A Novel by Charles Martin.

Update: 12/23/2017 – I heard the movie does not resemble the book/audiobook.  Which is too bad, because the book was terrific!

Book Brief (5 Stars: Loved it!)

I wont go into too much detail in this brief.  I don’t want to spoil the story for anyone.

While stranded in the middle of nowhere, in a frozen, desolate mountain range, between Salt Lake City, Utah and Denver, Colorado, an extraordinary hero, Dr. Ed Payne  takes one step at a time to survive.

On the surface The Mountain Between Us is a story of survival.  On a deeper level it is about the bonds that tie people together.

The author Charles Martin explores what it means to be truly in love.

I easily pictured the wilderness and enjoyed each moment of the story.  I felt it was cleverly written and well done.

I’ll just say the ending brought a few tears to my eyes.

 

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What Others Have To Say

This was a great love story. A real one. Not cheesy at all. – Debbie Stone

It’s a book that is both plot driven and also manages to get inside people’s emotional heads. – Deb (Readerbuzz) Nance

Book Review: My Name Is Lucy Barton by Elizabeth Strout

My Name Is Lucy Barton

My Review (5 Stars: Loved it!)

My Name Is Lucy Barton: A Novel by Elizabeth Strout

  • Audible Audio Edition
  • Listening Length: 4 hours and 12 minutes
  • Program Type: Audiobook
  • Version: Unabridged
  • Publisher: Random House Audio
  • Audible.com Release Date: January 12, 2016
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My Name Is Lucy Barton was an interesting read (listen) for a day.

Familial relationships can be complicated.  In My Name Is Lucy Barton, Lucy looks back at a time when her mother, after not seeing her in years, visits with her during her stay in the hospital.

Continue reading “Book Review: My Name Is Lucy Barton by Elizabeth Strout”

Book Review: My Notorious Life by Kate Manning

My Notorious Life

My Notorious Life: A Novel by Kate Manning

Terry Donnelly (Narrator), Simon & Schuster Audio (Publisher)

  • Audible Audio Edition
  • Listening Length: 19 hours and 59 minutes
  • Program Type: Audiobook
  • Version: Unabridged
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster Audio
  • Audible Release Date: September 10, 2013

My Review (5 Stars – Loved it!)

My Notorious Life: A Novel by Kate Manning is historical fiction and takes place mainly during the second half of the nineteenth century in New York City.  The protagonist, Axie Muldoon, daughter of Irish Immigrants, becomes an orphan and then becomes the notorious Madam X, searched out for her superior mid-wife skills as well as treatment for other female troubles.

This is a long novel (approximately 20 hrs.); however, I breezed right through it.  I must admit, having my own Irish ancestry, grandparents arriving in NYC in the early twentieth century, I was automatically fond of Axie.  She tells her story in the most interesting and fun way, even though the main topics are very serious.

I am also fond of Historical Fiction.  The author, Kate Manning, does a suburb job in representing this era.  Women of all classes come to Axie for help under their dire circumstances.  Axie does not turn them away, despite the peril she places herself in.  I doubt I will ever forget Axie.

Whatever side of women’s issues you find yourself on, I think you will enjoy this novel.

I highly recommend the audio version of this novel.  Axie has an Irish/New York accent and way of speaking which adds to the enjoyment of this novel.

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What Others Are Saying

“Axie’s profane Irish brogue is vividly recreated with virtually no anachronistic slips, and though a certain degree of polemical crusading is unavoidable given Axie’s proclivities, her voice never fails to entertain. – Kirkus Review

“Kate Manning has written a compelling novel about the plight of women and reproductive rights, and of course, the battle over these issues continues today. Highly recommended!” – Book of Secrets

Video (From The Author’s Website)

 

 

Book Brief: I Let You Go by Clare Mackintosh

I Let You Go

My Review (5 Stars: Loved it!)

Audible Audio Edition
Listening Length: 12 hours and 13 minutes
Program Type: Audiobook
Version: Unabridged
Publisher: Penguin Audio
Audible Release Date: May 3, 2016

I enjoyed I Let You Go by Clare Mackintosh.  I started listening to it one morning while catching up with my ironing and stayed up past midnight to finish it.  It is an impressive debut novel.  According to Clare’s website, she has a second novel out this year, I See You.

I Let You Go is about a five year old boy who is killed in a hit and run.  The novel is effectively narrated by Nicola Barber and Steven Crossley.  As the investigation into the accident continues we are given a chilling look at domestic violence.

What Others Are Saying

This novel was my local book club’s monthly selection.  On checking what others have to say on GoodReads, I was surprised many of my friends have read it.  I am not alone in my assessment.  Below are a few quotes.

“I LET YOU GO takes off like a speeding train and doesn’t stop with the suspense until the last page.” – Elizabeth @ Silver’s Reviews

“Wow, I LET YOU GO is an amazing psychological thriller.” –  Diana @ Book of Secrets

“This is a brilliantly written book which I couldn’t put down until I was finally finished.” – Maureen

“A chilling and dramatic conclusion left me holding my breath until the final page…and even then, I wasn’t sure that something dark would not appear at the last second.” – Laurel-Rain Snow

“I Let You Go will grab hold of you from the very opening sentence and leave you slack jawed.” – Lisa @ Sassy Cat Chat

“The ending is unexpected and shocking, and you wonder what will come next.” – Harvey @ Book Dilettante

About The Author (from the author’s website)

Clare spent twelve years in the police force, including time on CID, and as a public order commander. She left the police in 2011 to work as a freelance journalist and social media consultant, and now writes full time.

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Review: The Lost Girls by Heather Young

 

My Review (5 Stars: Loved it!)

The Lost Girls by Heather Young

Narrators: Alice Rosengard and Laurel Schroeder 

  • Audible Audio Edition
  • Listening Length: 12 hours and 35 minutes
  • Program Type: Audiobook
  • Version: Unabridged
  • Publisher: HarperAudio
  • Audible.com Release Date: July 26, 2016

The Lost Girls is told in a steady, very somber/dark tone.  It is multi layered with many surprising twists.

There are two narrators for this novel.  One narrative is about three young sisters and their relationship while spending the summer at the family’s lake house,.  It is told by one narrator in the voice of the middle sister, Lucy.

The second narration is about Lucy’s grand-neice, Justine, who inherits the house.  Justine has two daughters.

Having two different narrators was very effective.  Lucy is writing about that summer for Justine to read and know about what happened.  The author, Heather Young’s talents are clearly on display.

The Lost Girls gives you pause for thought about families, the relationships that exist behind closed doors and the evil that may be lurking there.

If the author’s second novel, Lovelock, is as good as her first, The Lost Girls, it will be a doozy.

This novel is reminiscent of another 5-star rated novel,  A Reliable Wife by Robert Goolrick (my review ~ 2014).

What Other’s Are Saying

“I enjoyed THE LOST GIRLS despite the gloomy feeling that seemed to overshadow everyone. Ms. Young has a marvelous, descriptive writing style that helped you understand and connect with each character and each situation.​ Her writing just pulled you into the story. ” – Elizabeth of Silver’s Reviews

“Impressive debut!” – Diana ☕ Book of Secrets

“I am thrilled to announce that The Lost Girls has been nominated for an Edgar Award for Best First Novel. – Heather Young 

“Young’s intricately wrought family drama tarries over details of time, place, and emotion as it gradually reveals her debut’s tragic core.” – Kirkus Review

About The Author (from the author’s website)

After a decade practicing law and another raising kids, Heather decided to finally write the novel she’d always talked about writing. She holds an MFA from the Bennington Writing Seminars, and is an alumnus of the Squaw Valley Writers Workshop and the Tin House Writers Workshop, all of which helped her stop writing like a lawyer. She lives in Mill Valley, California, with her husband and two teenaged children. When she’s not writing she’s biking, hiking, neglecting potted plants, and reading books by other people that she wishes she’d written.

She is currently working on her second novel, Lovelock.

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Review: The Women In Cabin 10 by Ruth Ware

 

My Review (5 Stars – Loved it!)

The Woman in Cabin 10 by Ruth Ware

  • Audible Audio Edition
  • Listening Length: 11 hours and 8 minutes
  • Program Type: Audiobook
  • Version: Unabridged
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster Audio
  • Audible.com Release Date: July 19, 2016

 Imogen Church (Narrator)

Once I started it, I enjoyed The Woman In Cabin 10 and listened to it over the course of a couple of days.  I listened to the enjoyable English accent of Imogen Church out-loud as I don’t like to wear headphones, if I don’t have to.

There was a lot of cursing, which didn’t bother me as it added to the tension in the story.  However, my husband, hearing nearby, expressed some shock!

The main character in the story, Lo Blacklock, suffers from anxiety.  When she is thrown into a whodunit murder mystery, her anxiety intensifies.  I thought the continual anxiety was a little overkill.  On second thought, that is the nature of anxiety and the author, Ruth Ware, captured it well.

To the author and narrator’s credit, I was, in a way, glued to my seat until the end.  While I didn’t feel it was a particularly clever plot, I rated it 5 Stars since it was entertaining.

On the Simon & Shuster’s website there are links for the book trailer as well as a reading group guide.

What Others Are Saying

“Whoa! This book was a wild ride.” Diana from Diana ☕ Book of Secrets

“The Woman in Cabin 10 was a riveting tale that kept me hanging on by a thread as it catapulted from one strange event to another.” – Laurel-Rain

About The Author (from the author’s website)

Ruth Ware grew up in Lewes, in Sussex and studied at Manchester University, before settling in North London. She has worked as a waitress, a bookseller, a teacher of English as a foreign language and a press officer.

Her début thriller In a Dark, Dark Wood and the follow-up The Woman in Cabin 10 were both Sunday Times top ten bestsellers in the UK, and New York Times top ten bestsellers in the US.  She is currently working hard on book three.

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Review: The Hating Game by Sally Thorne

The Hating Game: A Novel by Sally Thorne

William Morrow an Imprint of HarperCollinsPublisher, 2016

My Review (5 Stars: Loved it!)

I’ve been in the mood lately for chic-flicks (i.e. staring Sandra Bullock, Julia Roberts or Hugh Grant) and chic-lit, The Hating Game: A Novel by Sally Thorne.

The Hating Game is cute, fun and sexy.  Two young co-workers who sit across from each other are already engaged in many games such as the ‘staring’ game when they both become competitive for the same promotion to a new position.

Sally Thorne in her debut novels draws an interesting, smart plot with fun antics.

This novel was better than comfort-food and perfect for me for this time of year.

What Others Are Saying

“Lucy Hutton absolutely detests her office mate Joshua Templeman. He’s a pompous, self-important, obnoxious ass. But, she’s got to admit, he is pretty cute.”

“From the opening page, readers will know the outcome of Lucy and Joshua’s relationship, but what happens in between is magic. From Lucy’s hilarious inner dialogue to Joshua’s sharp retorts, the chemistry between them is irresistibly adorable—and smokin’ hot.” – Kirkus Review

“I love this book so much!! Couldn’t put it down, and it got me out of a book slump. So so good!!” – Brandie @ Brandie Is A Book Junkie

First Paragraph

“I have a theory.  Hating someone feels disturbingly similar to being in love with them.  I’ve had a lot of time to compare love and hate, and these are my observations.”

Read More or Purchase

About The Author

Sally Thorne lives in Canberra, Australia, and spends her days writing funding submissions and drafting contracts (yawn!), so it’s not surprising that after hours she climbs into colorful fictional worlds of her own creation.  She lives with her husband in a house filled with vintage toys, too many cushions, a haunted dollhouse, and the world’s sweetest pug.  The Hating Game is her first novel.

Coffee Table Book: Dogs and Their People by BarkPost

 

  • Hardcover: 288 pages
  • Publisher: G.P. Putnam’s Sons (October 18, 2016)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0399574263
  • ISBN-13: 978-0399574269
  • Product Dimensions: 8.4 x 0.9 x 8.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.7 pounds

My Review (5 Stars: Loved It!)

I’ve already written a Book Spotlight & Giveaway Contest post as well as a Mailbox Monday post about this book, but thought I would present it one more time.  It’s such a fun book!

Congratulations to Nise’ who won the giveaway contest.  Thanks to everyone who entered.

This hardcover is my new favorite coffee table book and favorite dog book.  It’s funny, has great heart-warming short stories and beautiful, truly adorable, images.

The pages have a nice weight to them.  I like the dimensions for a coffee table book (8.4 x 0.9 x 8.4 inches) and it’s not too heavy (1.7 lbs.).

Dogs and Their People: Photos and Stories of Life with a Four-Legged Love by BarkPost shows the great lengths people will go to for the love of their dogs.  It also includes many other interesting side notes.

There are so many heart-warming stories, too many to include here, but I’ll share one that gave me a laugh-out-loud moment:

“You Give Your Dog The Keys To NYC And Tell Him He’s The Mayor.”

When Hamilton Pug ventures out into his city (sometimes alternatively referred to as “New York City”), it is not uncommon for fans to recognize him and for future friends to stop and say hello.  It would be an understatement to say that Hamilton has mastered the art of the meet and great.  In fact, some people call him “The Mayor.”  It’s a fitting title, so we let him believe that he’s in charge.  His brother Rufus is his bodyguard. – Wendy, Steve, Hamilton & Rufus, New York, New York, p. 154

Read More or Purchase from Amazon (Currently on Sale)

I’d like to thank the folks at BarkPost and the Publisher, G.P. Putnam’s Sons, for sending me a hard-copy edition of this book for review.

Disclosure of Material Connection: 

I received this book free from the publisher, G.P. Putnam’s Sons. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own.  

Review: The Life We Bury by Allen Eskens

  • Audible Audio Edition
  • Listening Length: 8 hours and 24 minutes
  • Program Type: Audiobook
  • Version: Unabridged
  • Publisher: Tantor Audio
  • Audible.com Release Date: June 9, 2015
  • Narrator Zach Villa

My Review (5 Stars: Loved it!)

The Life We Bury by Allen Eskens has some violence in it, but it is about a murderer, so it fits the story well.  The novel is fast paced and well written.  I listened to it in just a few days as it held my interest.

At the opening of the story, the convicted murderer, Carl Iverson, is an old dying man in a nursing home.  Joe Talbert, a young college student, on a school assignment to write a biography of an older person, begins a quest to find out the truth about the rape and murder of a fourteen year old girl, thirty years ago.

I enjoyed Eskens’ characterizations.  In a short amount of time he was able to bring his characters to life and make them seem very realistic and in some cases sympathetic.

The various characters added another facet to the story,  Among the character’s were Joe’s bipolar mother and autistic brother and the college girl who lives next-door to Joe, but keeps her distance.  Another facet is Carl’s story from when he was a soldier in Vietnam.

The Life We Bury is an apropos title as it smartly shows, in several instances, the past that people move on from and in a sense bury.

The narrator, Zach Villa did a great job and was very easy to listen to.

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First Paragraph (from library book)

Published 2014 by Seventh Street Books an imprint of Prometheus Books

Chapter 1

I remember being pestered by a sense of dread as I walked to my car that day, pressed down by a wave of foreboding that swirled around my head and broke against the evening in small ripples.  There are people in this world who would call that kind of feeling a premonition, a warning from some internal third eye that can see around the curve of time.  I’ve never been one to buy into such things.  But I will confess that there have been times when I think back to that day and wonder: if the fates had truly whispered in my ear – if I had known how that drive would change so many things – would I have taken a safer path?  Would I turn left where before I had turned right? Or would I still travel the path that led me to Carl Iverson?

What Others Are Saying

“Allen Eskens had a way of capturing Joe’s voice in this book. The addition of what his family/home life was like was brilliant.”

“There are not many books in the last year that I can say I fell in love with right from the start, but this one earned that statement.” – Sheila @ BookJourney

“There’s a lot of action and tension so I found myself turning the pages as fast as I could.”

“I thought the storyline of THE LIFE WE BURY was strong and very compelling.” – Kathy @ BermudaOnion’s Web Log

About The Author (from the author’s website)

SHORT BIO

Allen Eskens is the award winning and USA Today-bestselling author of The Life We Bury, The Guise of Another and The Heavens May Fall. He is the recipient of the Barry Award, Rosebud Award and the Silver Falchion Award for his debut novel, The Life We Bury, which was also named a finalist for the Edgar® Award, Thriller Award, Anthony Award and the Minnesota Book Award. Allen honed his creative writing skills through the MFA program at Minnesota State University as well as classes at the Iowa Summer Writing Festival and the Loft Literary Center in Minneapolis. He is a member of the Twin Cities Sisters in Crime.